Friday, June 22, 2012

Kohlrabi...what to do

Whenever we look through the seed packets at any garden center I love to pick out fun new things to try and grow.  Some we buy.  Some we don't.  Some actually make it into soil. Some stay in the seed folder in the refrigerator.  Some actually thrive in the garden. Some send up a sprout, only to die off latter in the season.

This spring I started some kohlrabi seeds.  After a rather unspectacular start, they appear to be ready to harvest.  This is great, except I don't know what to do with kohlrabi.  I have spoken with "the ladies" at work to see what they recommend (nobody has ever cooked with it), and had to settle for suggestions of websites that typically have good recipes for slightly out of the ordinary vegetables.


In case you are also unfamiliar with kohlrabi, I give you a few of the high points.  It is a member of the brassica family and is supposed to taste milder than some of the other members of that family.  You can eat both the leaves and the swollen stem part.  Apparently you need to peel it, and then peel it again to remove a fibrous layer that can get stuck in your throat. Under that skin is a crisp, juicy vegetable that you eat eat raw or cooked.


This weekend I am planning on try to cook some kohlrabi. I am thinking of trying this recipe for Kohlrabi Home Fries, but may change my mind.  Most people seem to like it raw or purred.  I'm don't think I'm a purred kind of girl, but I may be convinced to try some raw.  After all, crisp and juicy sounds okay.


So, what garden experiments have tried lately? 

10 comments:

  1. One of co-workers mentioned growing kohlrabi. I'll need to ask her how she cooks it. I tried growing some California poppies indoors from seeds this year - epic failure. They need sun to grow. Scattered the remaining seeds in the garden.

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    1. We have our share of epic seed germination failure here too.

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  2. My gosh, I wish I could give you a recipe idea,bu I too never used kohlrabi. I never grew it either, but what I can tell, your kohlrabi looks pretty nice.

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  3. I bought some kohlrabi this year at the farmers market, because I had never tried it before. She had some out to taste raw, so I just cut mine up to use in salads. I bet it would be good cooked, too. Good luck finding your favorite dish!

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    1. I have to agree. After cooking it, I can say that I think it's better raw.

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  4. Grand-dad always grew this in his garden! I remember Grandma slicing the bulbs up and serving it on the "crudites" tray with dip. Very crunchy! I have never had it cooked. A very odd looking plant!

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    1. All I remember Grand-dad having were tomatoes. Kohlrabi has German roots...Kohl ("cabbage") and Rabi ("turnip"). As it turns out it is pretty good and would be excellent on a crudites tray.

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  5. Looks like something alien! I like it...you'll have to let us know how it tastes! :o)

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    1. Crazy looking isn't it. Tasted good. Kind of like a mild cabbage or broccoli.

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